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J Med Humanit. 2006 Winter;27(4):231-44.

Words and wards: a model of reflective writing and its uses in medical education.

Author information

1
Department of Family Medicine, University of California Irvine Medical Center, 101 City Drive South, Rte 81, Bldg 200, Suite 512, Orange, Irvine, California 92868, USA. jfshapir@uci.edu

Abstract

Personal, creative writing as a process for reflection on patient care and socialization into medicine ("reflective writing") has important potential uses in educating medical students and residents. Based on the authors' experiences with a range of writing activities in academic medical settings, this article sets forth a conceptual model for considering the processes and effects of such writing. The first phase (writing) is individual and solitary, consisting of personal reflection and creation. Here, introspection and imagination guide learners from loss of certainty to reclaiming a personal voice; identifying the patient's voice; acknowledging simultaneously valid yet often conflicting perspectives; and recognizing and responding to the range of emotions triggered in patient care. The next phase (small-group reading and discussion) is public and communal, where sharing one's writing results in acknowledging vulnerability, risk-taking, and self-disclosure. Listening to others' writing becomes an exercise in mindfulness and presence, including witnessing suffering and confusion experienced by others. Specific pedagogical goals in three arenas-professional development, patient care and practitioner well-being - are linked to the writing/reading/listening process. The intent of presenting this model is to help frame future intellectual inquiry and investigation into this innovative pedagogical modality.

PMID:
17001529
DOI:
10.1007/s10912-006-9020-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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