Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Neuron. 2006 Sep 21;51(6):741-54.

Neuroligins determine synapse maturation and function.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular Neurobiology and Center for the Molecular Physiology of the Brain, Max Planck Institute of Experimental Medicine, D-37075 Göttingen, Germany.

Abstract

Synaptogenesis, the generation and maturation of functional synapses between nerve cells, is an essential step in the development of neuronal networks in the brain. It is thought to be triggered by members of the neuroligin family of postsynaptic cell adhesion proteins, which may form transsynaptic contacts with presynaptic alpha- and beta-neurexins and have been implicated in the etiology of autism. We show that deletion mutant mice lacking neuroligin expression die shortly after birth due to respiratory failure. This respiratory failure is a consequence of reduced GABAergic/glycinergic and glutamatergic synaptic transmission and network activity in brainstem centers that control respiration. However, the density of synaptic contacts is not altered in neuroligin-deficient brains and cultured neurons. Our data show that neuroligins are required for proper synapse maturation and brain function, but not for the initial formation of synaptic contacts.

PMID:
16982420
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuron.2006.09.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center