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Vaccine. 2007 Jan 8;25(4):588-90. Epub 2006 Aug 31.

Higher pertussis hospitalization rates in indigenous Australian infants, and delayed vaccination.

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1
University of Sydney, Australia.

Abstract

This ecological study aimed to identify possible reasons for higher pertussis hospitalization rates in indigenous Australian infants. Two national datasets were analysed: the Hospital Morbidity Database and the Australian Childhood Immunisation Register (ACIR). Most (52%) pertussis hospitalizations in indigenous infants occurred at 0-2 months of age, and rates in these indigenous infants were significantly higher in remote areas. Indigenous infants had higher hospitalization rates and more frequently delayed vaccination than non-indigenous infants of the same age. These data suggest that residence in a remote area, as a proxy for poorer living conditions for indigenous people, and delayed vaccination, both contribute to higher pertussis hospitalization rates in indigenous infants.

PMID:
16971026
DOI:
10.1016/j.vaccine.2006.08.022
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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