Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Chest. 2006 Sep;130(3):694-701.

A comparison of cytology and fluorescence in situ hybridization for the detection of lung cancer in bronchoscopic specimens.

Author information

1
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. halling.kevin@mayo.edu

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES:

To determine the relative sensitivity and specificity of cytology and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for the detection of lung cancer in bronchoscopically obtained specimens.

DESIGN:

Cytology and FISH were performed on brushing and washing specimens obtained from patients undergoing bronchoscopy for suspected lung cancer. FISH utilized the LAVysion probe set (Abbott Molecular; Des Plaines, IL), which contains locus-specific probes to 5p15, 7p12 (EGFR), 8q24 (C-MYC), and a centromeric probe to chromosome 6.

SETTING:

Single-center, academic, tertiary medical center.

PARTICIPANTS:

One hundred thirty-seven patients referred for bronchoscopy for suspicion of lung cancer.

INTERVENTIONS:

Cytology and FISH were performed on bronchoscopic brushings and washings.

MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS:

One hundred thirty-seven patients undergoing bronchoscopy had pathology, FISH, and cytology results. FISH and cytology were performed on 123 washing and 78 brushing specimens. Sensitivities of FISH and cytology were 71% and 51% (p = 0.007), respectively, for brushing specimens, and 49% and 44% (p = 0.541) for washing specimens. When FISH and cytology results were combined, sensitivities were 75% and 61%, respectively, for brushing and washing specimens, which was significantly better (p < 0.001) than cytology alone. Specificities of FISH and cytology for patients with negative findings at the time of initial bronchoscopy were 83% and 100% (p = 0.125), respectively, for brushing specimens, and 95% and 100% (p = 0.500) for washing specimens.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings show that FISH is significantly more sensitive than conventional cytology for detecting lung cancer in bronchial brushing specimens; when combined with cytology, FISH can improve the diagnostic sensitivity of detecting malignancy in bronchial brushing and washing specimens.

PMID:
16963665
DOI:
10.1378/chest.130.3.694
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center