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J Neurotrauma. 2006 Sep;23(9):1379-91.

Transplantation of bone marrow stem cells as well as mobilization by granulocyte-colony stimulating factor promotes recovery after spinal cord injury in rats.

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1
Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic.

Abstract

Emerging clinical studies of treating brain and spinal cord injury (SCI) with autologous adult stem cells led us to compare the effect of an intravenous injection of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), an injection of a freshly prepared mononuclear fraction of bone marrow cells (BMCs) or bone marrow cell mobilization induced by granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) in rats with a balloon- induced spinal cord compression lesion. MSCs were isolated from rat bone marrow by their adherence to plastic, labeled with iron-oxide nanoparticles and expanded in vitro. Seven days after injury, rats received an intravenous injection of MSCs or BMCs or a subcutaneous injection of GCSF (from day 7 to 11 post-injury). Functional status was assessed weekly for 5 weeks after SCI, using the Basso-Beattie-Bresnehan (BBB) locomotor rating score and the plantar test. Animals with SCI treated with MSCs, BMCs, or G-CSF had higher BBB scores and better recovery of hind limb sensitivity than controls injected with saline. Morphometric measurements showed an increase in the spared white matter. MR images of the spinal cords were taken ex vivo 5 weeks after SCI using a Bruker 4.7-T spectrometer. The lesions populated by grafted MSCs appeared as dark hypointense areas. Histology confirmed a large number of iron-containing and PKH 26-positive cells in the lesion site. We conclude that treatment with three different bone marrow cell populations had a positive effect on behavioral outcome and histopathological assessment after SCI, which was most pronounced after MSC injection.

PMID:
16958589
DOI:
10.1089/neu.2006.23.1379
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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