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Patient Educ Couns. 2007 Jan;65(1):137-46. Epub 2006 Sep 6.

Social problem solving training for African Americans: effects on dietary problem solving skill and DASH diet-related behavior change.

Author information

1
College of Nursing, Wayne State University, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI 48202, USA. marshalesley@comcast.net

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Hypertension continues to take its toll on millions of African Americans. Adhering to an eating plan called Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) can significantly lower blood pressure. This study examined whether problem solving training in addition to education on DASH is more effective than education alone to help African Americans in an urban community college setting solve their own dietary problems and change eating behaviors that could affect blood pressure.

METHODS:

A randomized, two groups, multiple post-test design was used. All participants (N=78, 59% female) completed a Problem Solving Instrument immediately post-intervention and a follow-up Telephone Interview 2 weeks later.

RESULTS:

Fewer than half had normal blood pressure on screening. The Experimental Group identified and implemented significantly higher quality solutions to the second of their two problems than the Control Group. The intervention effect was the greatest for participants with blood pressure screenings above normal.

CONCLUSION:

Problem solving training combined with nutrition information may help African Americans to deal more effectively with dietary problems especially when the problems are complex or less well-defined.

PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS:

Dietary interventions that include a focus on everyday problem solving as well as knowledge acquisition can be developed in clinical, community health, school, and worksite settings.

PMID:
16950591
DOI:
10.1016/j.pec.2006.07.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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