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Biol Psychiatry. 2007 Jul 15;62(2):115-20. Epub 2006 Sep 1.

Does the Child Behavior Checklist juvenile bipolar disorder phenotype identify bipolar disorder?

Author information

1
Doctoral Program in Public Health Studies, Saint Louis University School of Public Health, Saint Louis, Missouri 63110, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

A profile of Child Behavior Checklist(CBCL) T-scores>or=70 on the attention problems, aggression, and anxious/depressed subscales has been proposed to identify juvenile bipolar disorder(JBD). We tested this hypothesis in a population-based sample.

METHODS:

Data for this analysis come from a birth-records-based twin sample having semi-structured interview and CBCL data (N=1,346). We compared prevalence of DSM-IV psychiatric disorders and suicidal behaviors in CBCL-JBD and non-CBCL-JBD subjects. Twin modeling assessed genetic and environmental contributions to CBCL-JBD. Associations with DRD4 and DAT1 were examined using chi-square tests.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of CBCL-JBD was 2.5%. No subjects with CBCL-JBD met criteria for bipolar or other mood disorders. CBCL-JBD subjects had more oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), conduct disorder(CD), and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder(ADHD). The CBCL-JBD profile was uncommon in these disorders. CBCL-JBD subjects more frequently endorsed suicidal behaviors. The CBCL-JBD profile was heritable and associated with the number of DAT1 9-repeat 3' untranslated region alleles.

CONCLUSIONS:

The CBCL-JBD phenotype does not correspond with a semi-structured interview assessment of JBD. ADHD, CD, and ODD are common in children with CBCL-JBD but do not account for the profile. Increased suicidal behaviors indicate substantial impairment in CBCL-JBD subjects.

PMID:
16950211
DOI:
10.1016/j.biopsych.2006.05.036
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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