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Ophthalmology. 2006 Sep;113(9):1574-82.

Causes of low vision and blindness in adult Latinos: the Los Angeles Latino Eye Study.

Author information

1
Doheny Eye Institute and Department of Ophthalmology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90033-9224, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To describe the causes of low vision and blindness in a population-based sample of adult Latinos.

DESIGN:

Population-based cross-sectional study.

PARTICIPANTS:

Six thousand three hundred fifty-seven Latinos 40 years and older from 6 census tracts in Los Angeles, California.

METHODS:

Participants underwent a detailed ophthalmologic examination including measurement of best-corrected distance visual acuity using a standard Early Treatment for Diabetic Retinopathy Study protocol, a complete anterior and posterior segment evaluation by an ophthalmologist, Humphrey Visual field testing, and optic disc and fundus photography. Consensus diagnosis of independent investigators reviewing all patient data was used to determine the major causes of low vision and blindness in adult Latinos.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Primary causes of vision loss in persons with low vision and blindness.

RESULTS:

The leading causes of low vision were cataract, diabetic retinopathy, and age-related macular degeneration, together accounting for approximately 82% of all persons with low vision. The primary causes of blindness were age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and myopic degeneration, accounting for 63% of the cases of blindness.

CONCLUSIONS:

Many of the leading causes of low vision and blindness in adult Latinos are potentially preventable and treatable diseases. Given the projected aging and growth in the Latino population, consideration needs to be given to the development of targeted early detection and treatment programs.

PMID:
16949442
DOI:
10.1016/j.ophtha.2006.05.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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