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Horm Res. 2006;66(6):277-84. Epub 2006 Aug 11.

Psychosocial functioning, self-perception and body image and their auxologic correlates in growth hormone and oestrogen-treated young adult women with Turner syndrome.

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1
Belgian Study Group of Paediatric Endocrinology (BSGPE), Department of Paediatric Endocrinology, University of Gent, Belgium.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Few data are available on the psychosocial status of growth hormone (GH) and oestrogen treated women with Turner syndrome (TS). In this study, we evaluated psychosocial functioning, self-concept and body image in GH and oestrogen treated young adult women with TS and we studied the relationship with auxological parameters.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

Thirty women with TS (mean +/- SD age: 22.1 +/- 2.4 years), all treated with GH and oestrogens if indicated, and an age-matched reference group of 44 non-Turner female students (age: 20.5 +/- 2.1 years) completed 3 questionnaires evaluating, respectively, behavioural and emotional problems (Young Adult Self Report), self-concept (Self Perception Profile for College Students) and body-image (Body Attitude Scale).

RESULTS:

TS patients did not report more behavioural and emotional problems compared to the non-TS females except for attention problems; they even reported fewer problems on some subscales (somatic complaints, thought problems, delinquent behaviour). TS patients did not differ from the non-TS female group in their bodily satisfaction. TS patients, particularly patients with a 45,X karyotype, perceived themselves as less socially competent. BMI was significantly related to the appraisal score of the Body Attitude Scale, whereas height was not related to any of the evaluated psychosocial parameters.

CONCLUSION:

The psychosocial adaptation of young adult women with TS, diagnosed at an early age and treated during childhood with GH and oestrogens if indicated, appears to be quite satisfactory. Follow-up of adult TS patients should not neglect the problem of overweight and associated psychosocial consequences.

PMID:
16946621
DOI:
10.1159/000095547
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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