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J Magn Reson Imaging. 2006 Oct;24(4):801-11.

MR spectroscopy: predicting long-term neuropsychological outcome following pediatric TBI.

Author information

1
Semel Institute for Neuroscience & Human Behavior, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California 90024, USA. tbabikian@mednet.ucla.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To identify useful acute indicators of long-term neurocognitive outcome beyond clinical variables for children and adolescents treated for a traumatic brain injury (TBI).

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

The efficacy of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) acquired 6+/-4 days after TBI in 20 children/adolescents in predicting intellectual and neuropsychological functioning one to four years post injury was assessed. Short echo-time single voxel MRS (SVS) from normal-appearing brain was compared to intermediate echo-time multivoxel MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) from normal-appearing and visibly-injured brain acquired through the level of the corpus callosum (CC).

RESULTS:

N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) was moderate to strongly correlated with cognitive scores. Mean NAA/creatine (Cre) from MRSI alone explained over 40% of the variance in cognitive scores and 18% of the variance above and beyond demographic and clinical variables alone. Mild to moderate associations were noted between SVS metabolites (glutamate/glutamine [Glx] and myoinositol [mI]) and cognitive scores, with no such associations apparent for choline (Cho) or Cre. Exploratory analyses revealed trends for regional neuroimaging data and specific cognitive abilities.

CONCLUSION:

Acute MR spectroscopy of the pediatric brain injury patient improves prognostic ability and may provide valuable information for early treatment and intervention planning.

PMID:
16941608
DOI:
10.1002/jmri.20696
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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