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Intensive Care Med. 2006 Oct;32(10):1640-3. Epub 2006 Aug 29.

Intravesicular pressure monitoring does not cause urinary tract infection.

Author information

1
Orlando Regional Medical Center, Department of Surgical Education, 86 West Underwood Street, Suite 201, Orlando, Florida, USA. michael.cheatham@orhs.org

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether intravesicular pressure monitoring using a closed system increases the risk of nosocomial urinary tract infection.

DESIGN:

Retrospective chart and database review.

SETTING:

Surgical/trauma intensive care units of a regional level-I trauma center.

PATIENTS:

3108 critically ill patients of which 122 patients underwent intravesicular pressure monitoring.

INTERVENTIONS:

Severity-adjusted urinary tract infection rates were compared among patients with and without intravesicular pressure monitoring.

MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS:

Over a 24-month period, 122 consecutive patients had 2202 intravesicular pressure measurements performed. During 1448 urinary catheter days, 15 patients who required intravesicular pressure monitoring developed a urinary tract infection with a severity-adjusted device-related infection rate of 7.9 infections per 1000 catheter days. Of the 2986 patients who did not require such monitoring, 98 patients developed a urinary tract infection with an infection rate of 6.5 infections per 1000 catheter days (p=0.56).

CONCLUSIONS:

Intravesicular pressure monitoring using the closed transducer technique is safe and does not increase the risk of urinary tract infection.

PMID:
16941168
DOI:
10.1007/s00134-006-0350-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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