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Acta Paediatr. 2006 Sep;95(9):1083-6.

Safe reduction in administration of naloxone to newborn infants: an observational study.

Author information

1
Martin House Hospice for Children and Young People, Wetherby, England, UK. debbiecbox@hotmail.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Naloxone, a specific opiate antagonist, is widely used during neonatal resuscitation to reverse possible opiate-induced respiratory depression.

AIM:

To determine the frequency with which naloxone is administered when resuscitation guidelines are conscientiously followed and to document any effect on respiratory morbidity.

METHODS:

Perinatal data including naloxone administration and respiratory morbidity were collected retrospectively, and compared with prospectively collected data following the introduction of "Good Practice" guidelines.

RESULTS:

There were 500 deliveries in the retrospective arm of the study and 1000 deliveries in the prospective arm. Although a similar proportion of women received opiates in labour in the two periods of study, there was a marked reduction in the use of naloxone when the guidelines were introduced (11% of opiate-exposed deliveries compared to 0.2%). There was no significant effect on respiratory morbidity with the change in practice.

CONCLUSION:

Naloxone is rarely needed to reverse the effects of opiates in newborn infants, and its use can be curtailed by following current resuscitation guidelines without increasing respiratory morbidity.

PMID:
16938754
DOI:
10.1080/08035250500525319
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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