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Arzneimittelforschung. 2006;56(7):535-40.

Effects of ascorbic acid on ambulatory blood pressure in elderly patients with refractory hypertension.

Author information

1
Division of Clinical Research of Hypertension, Department of Internal Medicine, Nagoya City Johoku Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. ksato@sb.starcat.ne.jp

Abstract

The increased production of reactive oxygen species plays a role in the etiology of hypertension, but the effects of antioxidants on blood pressure are controversial. However, antioxidants possibly lower blood pressure in elderly patients with hypertension, because vascular aging is also closely related to oxidative stress. Effects of chronic treatment with ascorbic acid (CAS 50-81-7; 600 mg/day for 6 months) on blood pressure and levels of C-reactive protein, 8-isoprostane, and malondialdehyde-modified low-density lipoproteins were examined in elderly patients (n = 12, six males/six females, age 78.3 +/- 5.0 years, mean +/- SD [range, 67 to 84 years]; elderly group) and adult patients (n = 12, five males/seven females, age 54.6 +/- 6.7 years [range, 39 to 621; adult group) with refractory hypertension. Chronic treatment with ascorbic acid markedly reduced systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure in ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in the elderly group (from 154.9 +/- 21.6 to 134.8 +/- 19.7 mmHg, p < 0.001; and from 79.1 +/- 22.1 to 63.4 +/- 18.7, p < 0.05; respectively), which was accompanied by an increase in the serum levels of ascorbic acid and decreases in the levels of C-reactive protein, 8-isoprostane, and malondialdehyde-modified low-density lipoproteins. In contrast, ascorbic acid did not affect blood pressure in the adult group. These results suggest that ascorbic acid is useful for controlling blood pressure in elderly patients with refractory hypertension.

PMID:
16927536
DOI:
10.1055/s-0031-1296748
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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