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Br J Nutr. 2006 Aug;96(2):357-64.

Favourable impact of low-calorie cranberry juice consumption on plasma HDL-cholesterol concentrations in men.

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1
Institute of Nutraceuticals and Functional Foods, Laval University, Qu├ębec G1K 7P4, Canada.

Abstract

A low HDL-cholesterol concentration is an independent risk factor for CVD. Studies have suggested that flavonoid consumption may be cardioprotective, and a favourable impact on circulating HDL-cholesterol concentrations has been suggested to partially explain this association. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of consuming increasing daily doses of low-calorie cranberry juice cocktail (CJC) on the plasma lipid profile of abdominally obese men. For that purpose, thirty men (mean age 51 (SD 10) years) consumed increasing doses of CJC during three successive periods of 4 weeks (125 ml/d, 250 ml/d, 500 ml/d). Before the study and after each phase, we measured changes in physical and metabolic variables. We noted a significant increase in plasma HDL-cholesterol concentration after the consumption of 250 ml CJC/d (+8.6+/-14.0% v. 0 ml CJC/d; P<0.01), an effect that plateaued during the last phase of the study (500 ml CJC/d: +8.1+/-10.0% v. 0 ml CJC/d; P<0.0001). Multivariate analyses revealed that changes in plasma apo A-I (R(2)=48%, P<0.0001) and triacylglycerol (R(2)=16%, P<0.005) concentrations were the only variables significantly contributing to the variation in plasma HDL-cholesterol concentration noted in response to the intervention. No variation was observed in total as well as in LDL and VLDL cholesterol. The present results show that daily CJC consumption is associated with an increase in plasma HDL-cholesterol concentrations in abdominally obese men. We hypothesise that polyphenolic compounds from cranberries may be responsible for this effect, supporting the notion that the consumption of flavonoid-rich foods can be cardioprotective.

PMID:
16923231
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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