Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Neurochem. 2006 Sep;98(5):1632-45.

Changes in brain gene expression after long-term sleep deprivation.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53719, USA. ccirelli@wisc.edu

Abstract

Long-term sleep deprivation in rats produces dramatic physiological changes including increase in energy expenditure, decrease in body weight, and death after 2-3 weeks. Despite several studies, the sleep deprivation syndrome remains largely unexplained. Here, to elucidate how prolonged sleep loss affects brain cells we used microarrays and screened the expression of > 26 000 transcripts in the cerebral cortex. Rats were sleep deprived using the disk-over-water method for 1 week. Seventy-five transcripts showed increased expression in these animals relative to controls that had been spontaneously awake or sleep deprived for a few hours. Most of them were induced as a result of chronic sleep loss and not non-specific effects of the disk stimulation. They include transcripts coding for several immunoglobulins, stress response proteins (macrophage inhibitor factor-related protein 14, heat-shock protein 27, alpha-B-crystallin), minoxidil sulfotransferase, globins and cortistatin. Twenty-eight transcripts decreased their expression in long-term sleep-deprived rats. Sixteen of them were specifically decreased as a result of chronic sleep loss, including those coding for type I procollagen and dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase. We also compared sleeping rats to short-term and long-term sleep-deprived rats, and found that acute and chronic sleep loss led to some differences at the molecular level. Several plasticity-related genes were strongly induced after acute sleep deprivation only, and several glial genes were down-regulated in both sleep deprivation conditions, but to a different extent. These findings suggest that sustained sleep loss may trigger a generalized inflammatory and stress response in the brain.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Wiley
    Loading ...
    Support Center