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Occup Environ Med. 2006 Dec;63(12):802-7. Epub 2006 Aug 15.

Mobile phone use and acoustic neuroma risk in Japan.

Author information

1
Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The rapid increase of mobile phone use has increased public concern about its possible health effects in Japan, where the mobile phone system is unique in the characteristics of its signal transmission. To examine the relation between mobile phone use and acoustic neuroma, a case-control study was initiated.

METHODS:

The study followed the common, core protocol of the international collaborative study, INTERPHONE. A prospective case recruitment was done in Japan for 2000-04. One hundred and one acoustic neuroma cases, who were 30-69 years of age and resided in the Tokyo area, and 339 age, sex, and residency matched controls were interviewed using a common computer assisted personal interview system. Education and marital status adjusted odds ratio was calculated with a conditional logistic regression analysis.

RESULTS:

Fifty one cases (52.6%) and 192 controls (58.2%) were regular mobile phone users on the reference date, which was set as one year before the diagnosis, and no significant increase of acoustic neuroma risk was observed, with the odds ratio (OR) being 0.73 (95% CI 0.43 to 1.23). No exposure related increase in the risk of acoustic neuroma was observed when the cumulative length of use (<4 years, 4-8 years, >8 years) or cumulative call time (<300 hours, 300-900 hours, >900 hours) was used as an exposure index. The OR was 1.09 (95% CI 0.58 to 2.06) when the reference date was set as five years before the diagnosis. Further, laterality of mobile phone use was not associated with tumours.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results suggest that there is no significant increase in the risk of acoustic neuroma in association with mobile phone use in Japan.

PMID:
16912083
PMCID:
PMC2078004
DOI:
10.1136/oem.2006.028308
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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