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BMC Med. 2006 Aug 15;4:18.

Use of email in a family practice setting: opportunities and challenges in patient- and physician-initiated communication.

Author information

1
6-Step Weight Loss Center, 13191 Starkey Rd, Suite A-3, Largo, FL 33773, USA. ayaz@6stepweightloss.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Electronic mail (email) has the potential to improve communication between physicians and patients.

METHODS:

We conducted two research studies in a family practice setting: 1) a brief, anonymous patient survey of a convenience sample to determine the number of clinic patients receptive to communicating with their physician via email, and 2) a randomized, controlled pilot study to assess the feasibility of providing health education via email to family practice patients.

RESULTS:

Sixty-eight percent of patients used email, and the majority of those (80%) were interested in using email to communicate with the clinic. The majority also reported that their email address changed less frequently than their home address (65%, n = 173) or telephone number (68%, n = 181). Forty-two percent were willing to pay an out-of-pocket fee to have email access to their physicians. When evaluating email initiated by the clinic, 26% of otherwise eligible patients could not participate because they lacked email access; those people were more likely to be black and to be insured through Medicaid. Twenty-four subjects agreed to participate, but one-third failed to return the required consent form by mail. All participants who received the intervention emails said they would like to receive health education emails in the future.

CONCLUSION:

Our survey results show that patients are interested in email communication with the family practice clinic. Our feasibility study also illustrates important challenges in physician-initiated electronic communication. The 'digital divide' - decreased access to electronic technologies in lower income groups - is an ethical concern in the use of email for patient-physician communication.

PMID:
16911780
PMCID:
PMC1563473
DOI:
10.1186/1741-7015-4-18
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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