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J Natl Med Assoc. 2006 Jul;98(7):1089-94.

Acceptance of pneumococcal vaccine under standing orders by race and ethnicity.

Author information

1
Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94115, USA. ndaniels@medicine.ucsf.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To assess whether and how pneumococcal vaccine acceptance occurs after nurse recommendation varies by race/ethnicity.

METHODS:

We prospectively evaluated nurses' standing orders to assess and vaccinate high-risk patients in a general medicine practice.

RESULTS:

Of 370 adult patients surveyed (60% nonwhite), 78 (21%) declined vaccination following nurse recommendation, and 43 (12%) persisted in declining after physician consultation. Three-hundred-twenty-seven (88%) patients accepted vaccination: 292 (79%) accepted following nurse recommendation and 35 (9%) following physician consultation. African Americans (19%) were significantly more likely to decline compared with whites (8%) and Asians (5%) (P= 0.01). Reasons for refusal included believing vaccination was unnecessary (32%), fearing shots in general (21%), fearing vaccine-induced illness (26%) and wanting more informotion regarding the vaccine (9%).

CONCLUSION:

Standing orders, physicians' firm recommendations and addressing patients' vaccine-related concerns may reduce racial/ethnic disparities in vaccination.

PMID:
16895277
PMCID:
PMC2569459
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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