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Curr Biol. 2006 Aug 8;16(15):1531-7.

IKK epsilon regulates F actin assembly and interacts with Drosophila IAP1 in cellular morphogenesis.

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1
Riken Center for Developmental Biology, 2-2-3 Minatojima-minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0047, Japan.

Abstract

Differentiated cells assume complex shapes through polarized cell migration and growth. These processes require the restricted organization of the actin cytoskeleton at limited subcellular regions. IKK epsilon is a member of the IkappaB kinase family, and its developmental role has not been clear. Drosophila IKK epsilon was localized to the ruffling membrane of cultured cells and was required for F actin turnover at the cell margin. In IKK epsilon mutants, tracheal terminal cells, bristles, and arista laterals, which require accurate F actin assembly for their polarized elongation, all exhibited aberrantly branched morphology. These phenotypes were sensitive to a change in the dosage of Drosophila inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 (DIAP1) and the caspase DRONC without apparent change in cell viability. In contrast to this, hyperactivation of IKK epsilon destabilized F actin-based structures. Expression of a dominant-negative form of IKK epsilon increased the amount of DIAP1. The results suggest that at the physiological level, IKK epsilon acts as a negative regulator of F actin assembly and maintains the fidelity of polarized elongation during cell morphogenesis. This IKK epsilon function involves the negative regulation of the nonapoptotic activity of DIAP1.

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PMID:
16887350
DOI:
10.1016/j.cub.2006.06.032
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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