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Pediatrics. 2006 Aug;118(2):483-92.

Incidence of pediatric traumatic brain injury and associated hospital resource utilization in the United States.

Author information

1
Center for Injury Research and Policy, Columbus Children's Research Institute, Columbus Children's Hospital, 700 Children's Dr, Columbus, Ohio 43205, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The goal was to examine the influence of sociodemographic characteristics and health care system factors on the utilization of hospital resources by US children < or = 17 years of age with a diagnosis of traumatic brain injury.

METHODS:

A retrospective analysis of data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids' Inpatient Database, from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2000, was performed. National estimates of traumatic brain injury-associated hospitalization rates and resource use were calculated with Kids' Inpatient Database sample weighting methods.

RESULTS:

Of 2,516,833 encounters between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2000, 25,783 cases involved patients < or = 17 years of age with a recorded diagnosis of traumatic brain injury. On the basis of these data, there were an estimated 50,658 traumatic brain injury-associated hospitalizations among children < or = 17 years of age in the United States in 2000. The traumatic brain injury-associated hospitalization rate was 70 cases per 100,000 children < or = 17 years of age per year; 15- to 17-year-old patients had the highest hospitalization rate (125 cases per 100,000 children per year). Pediatric inpatients accrued more than $1 billion in total charges for traumatic brain injury-associated hospitalizations in this study. In the multivariate regression models, older age, Medicaid insurance status, and admission to any type of children's hospital were associated with a longer length of stay for pediatric traumatic brain injury-associated hospitalizations. Older age, longer length of stay, and in-hospital death predicted higher total charges for traumatic brain injury-associated hospitalizations.

CONCLUSION:

Pediatric traumatic brain injury is a substantial contributor to the health resource burden in the United States, accounting for more than $1 billion in total hospital charges annually.

PMID:
16882799
DOI:
10.1542/peds.2005-2588
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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