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Neuropsychopharmacology. 2006 Dec;31(12):2783-92. Epub 2006 Jul 26.

Frontal lobe metabolic decreases with sleep deprivation not totally reversed by recovery sleep.

Author information

1
UC Irvine Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Irvine, CA, USA. jcwu@uci.edu

Abstract

We studied the effects of total sleep deprivation and recovery sleep in normal subjects using position emission tomography with 18F-deoxyglycose. Sleep deprivation resulted in a significant decrease in relative metabolism of the frontal cortex, thalamus, and striatum. Recovery sleep was found to have only a partial restorative effect on frontal lobe function with minimal reversal of subcortical deficits. Sleep may be especially important for maintenance of frontal lobe activity.

PMID:
16880772
DOI:
10.1038/sj.npp.1301166
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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