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Obstet Gynecol. 2006 Aug;108(2):361-8.

Clinical behavior of stage II-IV low-grade serous carcinoma of the ovary.

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1
Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Pathology, the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, 77230-1439, USA. DGERSHEN@mdanderson.org

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To analyze the clinical behavior of patients with stage II-IV low-grade serous carcinoma of the ovary seen at our institution who underwent primary surgery followed by platinum-based chemotherapy.

METHODS:

Patients with stage II-IV low-grade serous carcinoma of the ovary from 1978 to 2003 were identified using existing databases. Clinicopathologic information was obtained from medical records. Progression-free survival and overall survival were estimated by the method of Kaplan and Meier. The log-rank test was used to compare differences between survival curves. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed using Cox proportional hazards regression.

RESULTS:

We identified 112 eligible patients. Median age was 43 years.; 90% had stage III disease. Preoperative serum CA 125 was elevated in 86% of patients. The most common sites of extraovarian disease were omentum, fallopian tubes, pelvic peritoneum, and uterus. Response rate to platinum-based chemotherapy in 10 evaluable patients (15% of patients with gross residual disease) was 80%, and 42 patients underwent second-look surgery: microscopically negative findings, 2 (5%); microscopically positive disease, 13 (33%); macroscopically positive disease, 24 (62%); and insufficient information, 3 (7%). Median progression-free survival and overall survival times were 19.5 and 81.8 months. Persistent disease after primary chemotherapy was the only factor associated with shorter overall survival time (hazard ratio 3.46, 95% confidence interval 2.00-5.97, P<.001).

CONCLUSION:

Metastatic low-grade serous carcinoma of the ovary is characterized by young age at diagnosis and prolonged overall survival. Segregating women with this diagnosis in future clinical trials is warranted.

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