Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Int J Paediatr Dent. 2006 Sep;16(5):335-41.

The self-concept of adolescents with cleft lip and palate: a pilot study using a multidimensional/hierarchical measurement instrument.

Author information

  • 1Musculoskeletal Disorders, Murdoch Children's Research Institute, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To pilot the use of a multidimensional/hierarchical measurement instrument called the self-description questionnaire II to determine whether specific areas of self-concept in a group of adolescents with cleft lip and palate would be affected by their condition when compared with a normative sample.

PARTICIPANTS AND DESIGN:

The self-concept of 23 adolescents with a cleft of the lip and palate was compared to an Australian normative sample. Adolescents attending the dental department of a paediatric hospital in Australia.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

The main outcome measure was a self-report questionnaire (102 items) with 10 domain-specific scales and a global measure of general self-concept.

RESULTS:

When compared to the normative data the study group showed significant differences in 4 of the 11 domain-specific scales: Parent Relations (P < 0.001), Physical Abilities (P < 0.001), Opposite-Sex Relations (P < 0.01) and Physical Appearance (P < 0.01) self-concepts. These differences were in a positive direction. Global self-concept as measured by the General Self scale was not significantly different from the normative sample.

CONCLUSION:

These results suggest that adolescents with clefts of the lip and palate have normative if not better self-concept than their peers. The study also suggests that having a cleft of the lip and palate has specific rather than broad associations with psychosocial adjustment. This justifies the use of instruments designed to assess specific areas of self-concept rather than more global measures.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Wiley
    Loading ...
    Support Center