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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2006 Aug;87(8):1123-30.

Resistance training improves muscle function and body composition in patients with hyperthyroidism.

Author information

1
Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ, Brazil.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the effect of resistance training on skeletal muscle performance and body composition in patients with medically treated hyperthyroidism.

DESIGN:

Nonrandomized controlled trial.

SETTING:

Large public tertiary hospital.

PARTICIPANTS:

Sixteen sedentary patients with recent clinical diagnosis and laboratory confirmation of hyperthyroidism (7 men, 9 women; age, 38+/-11 y; weight, 58.4+/-2.6 kg; height, 1.6+/-0.3m) were assigned to the control group (medical therapy; n=9) or training group (medical therapy associated with resistance training; n=7). An age- and sex-matched healthy group served as controls (3 men, 5 women; age, 40+/-3 y; weight, 68.4+/-4.3 kg; height, 1.6+/-0.3m).

INTERVENTION:

Resistance training twice a week for 16 weeks.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Peak muscular strength (by dynamometry and 1 repetition maximum method) and endurance (30% of peak force) for 7 movements and anthropometric measurements.

RESULTS:

The hyperthyroid patients as a group had lower baseline overall strength values when compared with healthy subjects (200.3+/-16.0 kg vs 274.9+/-21.8 kg, respectively; P=.006). Overall absolute increases in strength (49 kg vs 91 kg, P<.05) and endurance (78.5x10(2)kg/s vs 176.9x10(2)kg/s, P<.05) were higher in the training group compared with the control group. Body weight increased in both groups, but the sum of muscular circumference increased only in the training group (training group, 92.6+/-3.3 cm vs 97.1+/-3.8 cm; control group, 94.6+/-2.2 cm vs 94.4+/-2.1cm; P<.05), with no change in the sum of skinfolds.

CONCLUSIONS:

Resistance training accelerates the recovery of skeletal muscle function and promotes weight gain based on muscle mass improvement in patients with medically treated hyperthyroidism.

PMID:
16876559
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2006.04.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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