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Gynecol Oncol. 2006 Dec;103(3):1017-22. Epub 2006 Jul 27.

Prevalence and predictors of squamous intraepithelial lesions of the cervix in HIV-infected women in Lusaka, Zambia.

Author information

1
School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA, and University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia. gparham@uabmc.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

HIV-infected women living in resource-constrained nations like Zambia are now accessing antiretroviral therapy and thus may live long enough for HPV-induced cervical cancer to manifest and progress. We evaluated the prevalence and predictors of cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) among HIV-infected women in Zambia.

METHODS:

We screened 150 consecutive, non-pregnant HIV-infected women accessing HIV/AIDS care services in Lusaka, Zambia. We collected cervical specimens for cytological analysis by liquid-based monolayer cytology (ThinPrep Pap Test) and HPV typing using the Roche Linear Array PCR assay.

RESULTS:

The median age of study participants was 36 years (range 23-49 years) and their median CD4+ count was 165/microL (range 7-942). The prevalence of SIL on cytology was 76% (114/150), of which 23.3% (35/150) women had low-grade SIL, 32.6% (49/150) had high-grade SIL, and 20% (30/150) had lesions suspicious for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). High-risk HPV types were present in 85.3% (128/150) women. On univariate analyses, age of the participant, CD4+ cell count, and presence of any high-risk HPV type were significantly associated with the presence of severely abnormal cytological lesions (i.e., high-grade SIL and lesions suspicious for SCC). Multivariable logistic regression modeling suggested the presence of any high-risk HPV type as an independent predictor of severely abnormal cytology (adjusted OR: 12.4, 95% CI 2.62-58.1, p=0.02).

CONCLUSIONS:

The high prevalence of abnormal squamous cytology in our study is one of the highest reported in any population worldwide. Screening of HIV-infected women in resource-constrained settings like Zambia should be implemented to prevent development of HPV-induced SCC.

PMID:
16875716
PMCID:
PMC2748907
DOI:
10.1016/j.ygyno.2006.06.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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