Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Diabetes Care. 2006 Aug;29(8):1897-901.

Impaired insulin secretion after prenatal exposure to the Dutch famine.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands.s.r.derooij@amc.uva.nl

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We previously reported that people prenatally exposed to famine during the Dutch Hunger Winter of 1944-1945 have higher 2-h glucose concentrations after an oral glucose tolerance test in later life. We aimed to determine whether this association is mediated through alterations in insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity, or a combination of both.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

We performed a 15-sample intravenous glucose tolerance test in a subsample of 94 normoglycemic men and women from the Dutch Famine Birth Cohort. We used the disposition index, derived as the product of insulin sensitivity and the first-phase insulin response to glucose as a measure of the activity of the beta-cells adjusted for insulin resistance. In all analyses, we adjusted for sex and BMI.

RESULTS:

Glucose tolerance was impaired in people who had been prenatally exposed to famine compared with people unexposed to famine (difference in intravenous glucose tolerance test K(g) value -21% [95% CI -41 to -4]). People exposed to famine during midgestation had a significantly lower disposition index (-53% [-126 to -3]) compared with people unexposed to famine. Prenatal exposure to famine during early gestation was also associated with a lower disposition index, but this difference did not reach statistical significance.

CONCLUSIONS:

Impaired glucose tolerance after exposure to famine during mid-gestation and early gestation seems to be mediated through an insulin secretion defect.

PMID:
16873799
DOI:
10.2337/dc06-0460
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire
Loading ...
Support Center