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Patient Educ Couns. 2006 Dec;64(1-3):342-9. Epub 2006 Jul 21.

Efficacy and cost-effectiveness of a clinic-based counseling intervention tested in an ethnically diverse sample of pregnant smokers.

Author information

1
Hartford Hospital, Department of Medicine, Hartford, CT 06102-5037, USA. edornel@harthosp.org

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Rates of cigarette smoking are higher among women who receive obstetric care through publicly funded prenatal clinics. This study compared smoking outcomes for pregnant women (n=105) who were randomized to receive either usual care (standard cessation advice from the health care provider) or an intervention conducted in the prenatal clinic consisting of 1.5 h of counseling plus telephone follow-up delivered by a masters prepared mental health counselor.

METHODS:

Subjects were 105 low income, predominantly Hispanic, pregnant patients in an urban prenatal clinic. Smoking outcomes were assessed at end of pregnancy and 6 months post-partum.

RESULTS:

At follow-up, 28.3% and 9.4% of participants in the experimental intervention and 9.6% and 3.8% of patients in usual care were abstinent at end of pregnancy (p=.015) and 6 months post-partum, respectively (p=.251). Cost of the intervention was $56 per patient and cost to produce a non-smoker at end of pregnancy was $299.

CONCLUSIONS:

This model for intervention was cost-effective and was associated with significantly lower smoking rates at end of pregnancy.

PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS:

If these findings are replicated, prenatal clinics could offer the option for intensive smoking cessation treatment by training mental health counselors to deliver one extended smoking cessation counseling session.

PMID:
16859864
DOI:
10.1016/j.pec.2006.03.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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