Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Arthroscopy. 2006 Jul;22(7):721-7.

Suprascapular nerve palsy secondary to spinoglenoid cysts: results of arthroscopic treatment.

Author information

1
Mount Carmel Health System, Columbus, Ohio, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this study was to investigate the results of arthroscopic treatment in 14 patients with suprascapular nerve palsy secondary to spinoglenoid ganglion cysts.

METHODS:

Fourteen patients underwent arthroscopic decompression of ganglion cysts associated with suprascapular neuropathy. The most common presenting symptoms were pain and weakness, which lasted an average of 7.5 months. Ten of 14 patients were noted on examination to have atrophy, and all 14 patients had weakness of the infraspinatus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed spinoglenoid ganglion cysts in all 14 patients; average cyst size was 3 cm. MRI revealed labral pathology in 12 of 14 cases; labral pathology was identified intraoperatively in all 14 patients.

RESULTS:

Postoperatively, the average Simple Shoulder Test (SST) score was 11.5 (12 maximum), which was improved from an estimated preoperative score of 4.3. Improvement in external rotation strength was seen in 100% of patients who were examined postoperatively. No patients were taking pain medicine at latest follow-up. No complications were reported, and there were no clinical or symptomatic recurrences at an average follow-up of 51 months.

CONCLUSIONS:

Arthroscopic treatment of patients with spinoglenoid ganglion cysts is safe and effective, resulting in good clinical outcomes. In our study of 14 patients, no recurrences were seen at an average of 51 months of follow-up. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic case series.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:

Level IV, therapeutic case series.

PMID:
16843807
DOI:
10.1016/j.arthro.2006.03.019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center