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Science. 2006 Jul 14;313(5784):220-3.

A bacterial virulence protein suppresses host innate immunity to cause plant disease.

Author information

1
Department of Energy Plant Research Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA.

Abstract

Plants have evolved a powerful immune system to defend against infection by most microbial organisms. However, successful pathogens, such as Pseudomonas syringae, have developed countermeasures and inject virulence proteins into the host plant cell to suppress immunity and cause devastating diseases. Despite intensive research efforts, the molecular targets of bacterial virulence proteins that are important for plant disease development have remained obscure. Here, we show that a conserved P. syringae virulence protein, HopM1, targets an immunity-associated protein, AtMIN7, in Arabidopsis thaliana. HopM1 mediates the destruction of AtMIN7 via the host proteasome. Our results illustrate a strategy by which a bacterial pathogen exploits the host proteasome to subvert host immunity and causes infection in plants.

PMID:
16840699
DOI:
10.1126/science.1129523
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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