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J Atten Disord. 2006 Aug;10(1):44-53.

Training attention-switching ability in adults with ADHD.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of Memphis, TN 31852, USA. hawhite@memphis.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Children with ADHD show attention-switching impairment. The present study assessed attention-switching ability in adults with ADHD, the extent to which this ability can be improved via targeted training, and the degree to which training extends to novel tasks of attention-switching.

METHOD:

Adults with ADHD (n = 16) and adults without ADHD (n = 18) were divided into training and non-training groups. Training groups performed six blocks of four different attention-switching tasks, while non-training groups completed non-switching, "filler" tasks. Lastly, the four groups were tested on two novel attention-switching tasks.

RESULTS:

Adults with ADHD showed impaired attention-switching, relative to non-ADHD adults, but training significantly improved attention-switching in both ADHD and non-ADHD training groups. Finally, training effects transferred to new tasks of attention-switching.

CONCLUSION:

Adults with ADHD show attention-switching impairments, but deficits may be ameliorated with short-term, targeted training. Research has implications for cognitive training in ADHD.

PMID:
16840592
DOI:
10.1177/1087054705286063
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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