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J Aging Health. 2006 Aug;18(4):552-64.

Promoting smoking cessation among the elderly: what are the predictors of intention to quit and successful quitting?

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1
Boston University School of Health, USA and The University of Hong Kong.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To assess the predictors of smoking cessation and intention to quit among the Chinese elderly smokers.

DESIGN:

A cross-sectional survey of elderly smokers.

SETTING:

Shamsuipo district, Hong Kong.

SUBJECT:

A total of 1,318 elderly were interviewed (response rate = 83%).

MEASURES:

A structured questionnaire was used for data collection. The questionnaire sought information on the subject's sociodemographic background and smoking habits. The predictors for successful quitting and intention to quit were assessed by chi-square tests and multiple logistic regression.

RESULTS:

Of the respondents, 20.2% were current smokers, 25.4% were ex-smokers, and 54.4% were never smokers. Of the smoker (current and ex-smokers) respondents, 55.7% (335/601) had successfully quit at the time of enumeration. The predictors of quitting were living with others, receiving assistance for mobility, being nondrinkers, smoking for shorter duration, and smoking more cigarettes per day. Having health problems in the past, smoking for shorter duration, and smoking fewer cigarettes per day were predictors of intention to quit smoking.

CONCLUSION:

The study identified several predictors of successful quitting that could help improve the provision of current smoking cessation services. Population-based smoking cessation programs, especially those targeted to elderly, should take these predictors into consideration in the design of interventions.

PMID:
16835389
DOI:
10.1177/0898264305281104
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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