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J Mol Cell Cardiol. 2006 Aug;41(2):340-9. Epub 2006 Jul 7.

Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-derived NADPH fuels superoxide production in the failing heart.

Author information

1
Department of Physiology, BSB Room 626, New York Medical College, Valhalla, 10595, USA. sachin_gupte@nymc.edu

Abstract

In the failing heart, NADPH oxidase and uncoupled NO synthase utilize cytosolic NADPH to form superoxide. NADPH is supplied principally by the pentose phosphate pathway, whose rate-limiting enzyme is glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). Therefore, we hypothesized that cardiac G6PD activation drives part of the excessive superoxide production implicated in the pathogenesis of heart failure. Pacing-induced heart failure was performed in eight chronically instrumented dogs. Seven normal dogs served as control. End-stage failure occurred after 28 +/- 1 days of pacing, when left ventricular end-diastolic pressure reached 25 mm Hg. In left ventricular tissue homogenates, spontaneous superoxide generation measured by lucigenin (5 microM) chemiluminescence was markedly increased in heart failure (1338 +/- 419 vs. 419 +/- 102 AU/mg protein, P < 0.05), as were NADPH levels (15.4 +/- 1.5 vs. 7.5 +/- 1.5 micromol/gww, P < 0.05). Superoxide production was further stimulated by the addition of NADPH. The NADPH oxidase inhibitor gp91(ds-tat) (50 microM) and the NO synthase inhibitor L-NAME (1 mM) both significantly lowered superoxide generation in failing heart homogenates by 80% and 76%, respectively. G6PD was upregulated and its activity higher in heart failure compared to control (0.61 +/- 0.10 vs. 0.24 +/- 0.03 nmol/min/mg protein, P < 0.05), while superoxide production decreased to normal levels in the presence of the G6PD inhibitor 6-aminonicotinamide. We conclude that the activation of myocardial G6PD is a novel mechanism that enhances NADPH availability and fuels superoxide-generating enzymes in heart failure.

PMID:
16828794
DOI:
10.1016/j.yjmcc.2006.05.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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