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Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Jul;84(1):70-6; quiz 266-7.

Relations of glycemic index and glycemic load with plasma oxidative stress markers.

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1
Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Recent data suggest that acute hyperglycemia may increase in vivo free radical production. This increased production has been implicated in many disease processes.

OBJECTIVE:

The objective was to investigate whether a diet with a high glycemic index (GI) or glycemic load (GL) is associated with greater oxidative stress as measured by 2 lipid peroxidation markers, malondialdehyde (MDA) and F2-isoprostanes (IsoPs).

DESIGN:

Plasma MDA and IsoP concentrations were measured in 292 healthy adults, and dietary GI and GL were assessed by using a validated food-frequency questionnaire. Cross-sectional associations between GI, GL, and the 2 markers were examined by using multiple regression techniques with adjustment for potential confounding variables.

RESULTS:

Dietary GI was positively associated with both plasma MDA and IsoPs. The mean multivariate-adjusted MDA concentrations increased from 0.55 to 0.73 micromol/L as GI increased from the lowest to the highest quartile (P for trend = 0.02); the corresponding IsoP concentrations increased from 0.034 to 0.040 ng/mL (P for trend = 0.03). GL was positively associated with both MDA and IsoPs, but the linear relation was significant only for MDA. In addition, a marginally significant interaction between overall GI and body mass index (BMI; in kg/m2) for plasma MDA was observed (P = 0.09). The positive association between overall GI and MDA was stronger in those with a BMI < 26.5 than for those with a BMI > or = 26.5.

CONCLUSIONS:

Chronic consumption of high-GI foods may lead to chronically high oxidative stress. A low-GI diet, not a low-carbohydrate diet, appears to be beneficial in reducing oxidative stress.

PMID:
16825683
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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