Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Clin Invest. 2006 Jul;116(7):1913-23.

The A2B adenosine receptor protects against inflammation and excessive vascular adhesion.

Author information

  • 1Department of Biochemistry and Whitaker Cardiovascular Institute, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02118, USA.

Abstract

Adenosine has been described as playing a role in the control of inflammation, but it has not been certain which of its receptors mediate this effect. Here, we generated an A2B adenosine receptor-knockout/reporter gene-knock-in (A2BAR-knockout/reporter gene-knock-in) mouse model and showed receptor gene expression in the vasculature and macrophages, the ablation of which causes low-grade inflammation compared with age-, sex-, and strain-matched control mice. Augmentation of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-alpha, and a consequent downregulation of IkappaB-alpha are the underlying mechanisms for an observed upregulation of adhesion molecules in the vasculature of these A2BAR-null mice. Intriguingly, leukocyte adhesion to the vasculature is significantly increased in the A2BAR-knockout mice. Exposure to an endotoxin results in augmented proinflammatory cytokine levels in A2BAR-null mice compared with control mice. Bone marrow transplantations indicated that bone marrow (and to a lesser extent vascular) A2BARs regulate these processes. Hence, we identify the A2BAR as a new critical regulator of inflammation and vascular adhesion primarily via signals from hematopoietic cells to the vasculature, focusing attention on the receptor as a therapeutic target.

PMID:
16823489
PMCID:
PMC1483170
DOI:
10.1172/JCI27933
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Journal of Clinical Investigation Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center