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Nature. 2006 Jul 6;442(7098):59-62.

Resonance in the electron-doped high-transition-temperature superconductor Pr0.88LaCe0.12CuO4-delta.

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1
Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-1200, USA.

Abstract

In conventional superconductors, the interaction that pairs the electrons to form the superconducting state is mediated by lattice vibrations (phonons). In high-transition-temperature (high-T(c)) copper oxides, it is generally believed that magnetic excitations might play a fundamental role in the superconducting mechanism because superconductivity occurs when mobile 'electrons' or 'holes' are doped into the antiferromagnetic parent compounds. Indeed, a sharp magnetic excitation termed 'resonance' has been observed by neutron scattering in a number of hole-doped materials. The resonance is intimately related to superconductivity, and its interaction with charged quasi-particles observed by photoemission, optical conductivity, and tunnelling suggests that it might play a part similar to that of phonons in conventional superconductors. The relevance of the resonance to high-T(c) superconductivity, however, has been in doubt because so far it has been found only in hole-doped materials. Here we report the discovery of the resonance in electron-doped superconducting Pr0.88LaCe0.12CuO4-delta (T(c) = 24 K). We find that the resonance energy (E(r)) is proportional to T(c) via E(r) approximately 5.8k(B)T(c) for all high-T(c) superconductors irrespective of electron- or hole-doping. Our results demonstrate that the resonance is a fundamental property of the superconducting copper oxides and therefore must be essential in the mechanism of superconductivity.

PMID:
16823448
DOI:
10.1038/nature04857
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