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Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2007 Mar;101(3):317-24. Epub 2006 Jul 4.

Factors associated with the incompliance with mammogram screening among individuals with a family history of breast cancer or ovarian cancer.

Author information

1
United States Military Cancer Institute, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, 6900 Georgia Ave., NW Building 1, Suite E-111, Washington, DC 20307-5001, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The national guidelines recommend more intensive screening for breast cancer for women with a family history of breast or ovarian cancer. Using the data from the 2000 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), we examined factors related to the underuse of mammogram in this population.

METHOD:

The study subjects were 1,215 women aged 30-79 who had a family history of breast or ovarian cancer in their first-degree relatives. According to the American Cancer Society's guidelines for breast cancer screening, having no mammogram in last year was used as an outcome for this study. Socio-demographic characteristics, health-related conditions, lifestyle factors, health behaviors, menstrual/reproductive information and health care access and utilization were analyzed to assess their relations to mammogram underuse using unconditional logistic regression method.

RESULTS:

The results showed that younger age, having no place to go when sick (OR = 2.2, 95% CI, 1.2-4.0), having no visits to a general doctor (OR = 1.7, 95% CI, 1.2-2.4) or medical specialist (OR = 2.2, 95% CI, 1.6-3.1) and having no influenza shot in last year (OR = 1.7, 95% CI, 1.2-2.3) increased the risk of underusing mammography screening among women who had a family history of breast or ovarian cancer. Women who had no home care from health professionals in the last year were less likely to underuse mammogram with an OR of 0.3 (95% CI, 0.1-0.6), compared with women who had.

CONCLUSION:

Medical care-related factors may affect the use of mammography screening in women with a family history of breast or ovarian cancer.

PMID:
16821080
DOI:
10.1007/s10549-006-9298-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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