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J Clin Psychol. 2006 Oct;62(10):1291-302.

The effect of positive writing on emotional intelligence and life satisfaction.

Author information

1
University of New England, Armidale, NSW, Australia.

Abstract

This study explored the effect of writing about positive emotional experiences on emotional intelligence and life satisfaction. One hundred and seventy-five adults wrote about one of the following three topics: positive experiences with a cue for emotion regulation reflection, positive experiences without this cue, or a control writing topic. Multivariate analysis showed a significant time (pretest, posttest, and follow-up) by group effect. Writing about positive emotional experiences with an emotion regulation cue led to significant increases in emotional intelligence and life satisfaction at posttest and the increase in life satisfaction was maintained at 2-week follow-up. Further, participants who were cued to reflect on emotional regulation while writing about positive experiences rated their emotional intelligence significantly higher than the participants in the control writing group both at posttest and at follow-up. There were no significant differences in emotional intelligence or life satisfaction between those who were cued to reflect on emotional regulation while writing about positive experiences and those who wrote about positive experiences without such a cue.

PMID:
16810662
DOI:
10.1002/jclp.20292
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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