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Am J Public Health. 2006 Aug;96(8):1498-504. Epub 2006 Jun 29.

Cessation among smokers of "light" cigarettes: results from the 2000 national health interview survey.

Author information

1
University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, 15213, USA. tindleha@upmc.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

A large proportion of smokers erroneously believe that low-nicotine/low-tar cigarettes, also called "light cigarettes" or "lights," reduce health risks and are a rational alternative to smoking cessation. However, the availability of light cigarettes may deter smoking cessation.

METHODS:

We analyzed the 32374 responses to the US 2000 National Health Interview Survey. Current and former smokers ("ever-smokers") were asked if they had ever used a lower tar and nicotine cigarette to reduce health risks. Multivariable logistic regression identified determinants of lights use and smoking cessation. Results were weighted to reflect the national population.

RESULTS:

Of 12285 ever-smokers, 37% (N=4414) reported having used light cigarettes to reduce health risks. Current abstinence was less often reported by ever-smokers who had previously used light cigarettes than by ever-smokers who had never used lights (37% vs 53%, P<.01). Adjusted odds of cessation among ever-smokers who had used light cigarettes relative to those who had never used lights were reduced by 54% (adjusted odds ratio=0.46, 95% confidence interval=0.41, 0.51).

CONCLUSIONS:

Use of light cigarettes was common and was associated with lower odds of current smoking cessation, validating the concern that smokers may use lights as an alternative to cessation.

PMID:
16809583
PMCID:
PMC1522106
DOI:
10.2105/AJPH.2005.072785
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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