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Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2006;40(3):187-91.

Influence of hypercalcic and/or hyperoxalic diet on calcium oxalate renal stone formation in rats.

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1
04/UR/09-03 Faculté de Médecine de Monastir, Tunisia. bardaouimourad@yahoo.fr

Erratum in

  • Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2010 Dec;44(6):462. Mourad, Bardaoui [corrected to Bardouri, Mourad]; Fadwa, Neffati [corrected to Neffati, Fadwa];Mounir, Trimeche [corrected to Trimeche, Mounir]; Abdelhamid, Elhani [corrected to Elhani, Abdelhamid]; Mohamed Fadhel, Najjar [corrected to Fadhel Najjar, Mohamed]; Rachid, Sakly [corrected to Sakly, Rachid].

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To test whether increasing dietary calcium intake prevents calcium oxalate stone formation when the diet is oxalate-rich. Material and methods. Four groups, eight rats in each, were subjected to a lithogenic diet by the addition of 0.5% ethylene glycol to drinking water for 3 weeks. The first group, used as a control, simultaneously received a standard diet. The second group was supplemented with calcium at 500 mg/100 g of diet and the third group with oxalate at 3 g/100 g of diet. The diet given to the last group was supplemented with similar doses of calcium and oxalate. One day before the end of treatment, each animal was placed in a metabolic cage to collect 24-h urine samples and determine urinary parameters. The kidneys were removed to determine calcium oxalate deposits and for histological examination.

RESULTS:

The number of calcium oxalate crystals in renal tissue was highest in the oxalate group and calcium oxalate deposits were also found to be elevated in this group. Hyperoxaluria and hypocitraturia, induced by a oxalate-rich diet, seemed to be the major causes contributing to aggravated renal stone formation. The protective effect of dietary calcium supplementation, which was clear in the calcium + oxalate group, was probably due to intestinal binding of oxalate by calcium, thereby reducing urinary oxalate excretion.

CONCLUSION:

Increased dietary calcium intake can prevent calcium oxalate stone formation only when the diet is oxalate-rich.

PMID:
16809257
DOI:
10.1080/00365590600621261
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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