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Trends Neurosci. 2006 Jul;29(7):359-366. doi: 10.1016/j.tins.2006.06.004. Epub 2006 Jun 27.

Autism, the superior temporal sulcus and social perception.

Author information

1
URM 0205 Brain Imaging in Psychiatry, INSERM-CEA, Service Hospitalier Frédéric Joliot, CEA, 4 Place du General Leclerc, Orsay 91406, France. Electronic address: mozilbo@gmail.com.
2
URM 0205 Brain Imaging in Psychiatry, INSERM-CEA, Service Hospitalier Frédéric Joliot, CEA, 4 Place du General Leclerc, Orsay 91406, France; Service des Urgences Cerebro-Vasculaires, Groupe Hospitalier Pitié-Salpêtrière, AP-HP, 47 Bl. de l'Hôpital, Paris 75013, France.
3
Service de Pédopsychiatrie, Hôpital Robert Debré, AP-HP, 48 Bl. Serurier, Paris 75019, France.
4
Hôpital Necker Enfants Malades, AP-HP, Paris V, 149 Rue de Sevre, Paris 75007, France.
5
Service des Urgences Cerebro-Vasculaires, Groupe Hospitalier Pitié-Salpêtrière, AP-HP, 47 Bl. de l'Hôpital, Paris 75013, France.
6
URM 0205 Brain Imaging in Psychiatry, INSERM-CEA, Service Hospitalier Frédéric Joliot, CEA, 4 Place du General Leclerc, Orsay 91406, France; Hôpital Necker Enfants Malades, AP-HP, Paris V, 149 Rue de Sevre, Paris 75007, France.

Abstract

The most common clinical sign of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is social interaction impairment, which is associated with communication deficits and stereotyped behaviors. Based on recent brain-imaging results, our hypothesis is that abnormalities in the superior temporal sulcus (STS) are highly implicated in ASD. STS abnormalities are characterized by decreased gray matter concentration, rest hypoperfusion and abnormal activation during social tasks. STS anatomical and functional anomalies occurring during early brain development could constitute the first step in the cascade of neural dysfunction underlying ASD. We will focus this review on the STS, which has been highly implicated in social cognition. We will review recent data on the contribution of the STS to normal social cognition and review brain-imaging data implicating this area in ASD. This review is part of the INMED/TINS special issue "Nature and nurture in brain development and neurological disorders", based on presentations at the annual INMED/TINS symposium (http://inmednet.com/).

PMID:
16806505
DOI:
10.1016/j.tins.2006.06.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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