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Diabetes. 2006 Jul;55(7):1954-60.

Comparison of serum high-molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin with total adiponectin concentrations in type 2 diabetic patients with coronary artery disease using a novel enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to detect HMW adiponectin.

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1
Department of Internal Medicine, Koshigaya Hospital, Dokkyo Medical University, 2-1-50 Minami-Koshigaya, Koshiagya, Saitama 343-8555, Japan. yaso@dokkyomed.ac.jp

Abstract

Adiponectin (Acrp30), an adipocyte-derived protein, exists in serum as a trimer, a hexamer, and a high-molecular weight (HMW) form, including 12-18 subunits. Because HMW adiponectin may be biologically active, we measured it in serum using a novel enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) confirmed by gel filtration chromatography that the ELISA detected mainly adiponectin with 12-18 subunits, and we compared HMW with total adiponectin concentration in patients with type 2 diabetes. We next investigated the relationship between serum HMW and coronary artery disease (CAD) in 280 consecutive type 2 diabetic patients, including 59 patients with angiographically confirmed CAD. Total adiponectin was measured in serum by a commercially available ELISA. Like serum total adiponectin, HMW adiponectin correlated positively with HDL cholesterol and negatively with triglyceride, insulin sensitivity, creatinine clearance, and circulating inflammatory markers. Total and HMW adiponectin were significantly higher in women than in men, as was the HMW-to-total adiponectin ratio. Serum HMW and the HMW-to-total adiponectin ratio were significantly lower in men with than without CAD (P < 0.05, respectively). In women, the ratio, but neither total nor HMW adiponectin, tended to be lower when CAD was present. In conclusion, determination of HMW adiponectin, especially relative to total serum adiponectin, is useful for evaluating CAD in type 2 diabetic patients.

PMID:
16804063
DOI:
10.2337/db05-1525
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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