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Diabetologia. 2006 Aug;49(8):1838-44. Epub 2006 Jun 27.

Direct evidence of attempted beta cell regeneration in an 89-year-old patient with recent-onset type 1 diabetes.

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1
Larry Hillblom Islet Research Center, UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California-Los Angeles, 900 Veteran Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095-7073, USA.

Abstract

AIMS/HYPOTHESIS:

We investigated whether there was evidence of attempted beta cell regeneration in the pancreas obtained from a patient with recent-onset type 1 diabetes, and if so by what mechanism this occurred.

SUBJECTS, MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We examined pancreas tissue from a lean 89-year-old patient (BMI 18.0 kg/m(2)) with recent-onset type 1 diabetes who had had a distal pancreatectomy to remove a low-grade pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia.

RESULTS:

In the tumour-free tissue, the fractional beta cell area was 0.54+/-0.2% of pancreas area (about one-third of that in non-diabetic humans). CD3-positive T lymphocytes and macrophages had infiltrated the majority of the islets. Subclassification of the T cell population revealed a predominance of CD8-positive cells over CD4-positive cells. Beta cell apoptosis (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick-end labelling [TUNEL] staining) was greatly increased, consistent with ongoing immune-mediated beta cell destruction. There was also a marked increase (more than approximately 100-fold) in the frequency of beta cell replication (0.69+/-0.15% Ki67-positive beta cells) in all blocks examined.

CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION:

The present report provides direct evidence of attempted beta cell regeneration through the mechanism of beta cell replication in a case of newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes, and affirms that beta cell apoptosis is an important mechanism for beta cell loss in type 1 diabetes.

PMID:
16802132
DOI:
10.1007/s00125-006-0308-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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