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Addict Biol. 2006 Jun;11(2):145-51.

Effects of aqueous, methanolic and chloroform extracts of rhizome and aerial parts of Valeriana officinalis L. on naloxone-induced jumping in morphine-dependent mice.

Author information

1
Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. msharifzadeh@sina.tums.ac.ir

Abstract

In the present study, the effects of rhizomes and aerial parts extracts of Valeriana officinalis L. on morphine dependence in mice have been investigated. Animals were treated subcutaneously with morphine (50, 50 and 75 mg/kg) three times daily (10 am, 1 pm and 4 pm) for 3 days, and a last dose of morphine (50 mg/kg) was administered on the fourth day. Withdrawal syndrome (jumping) was precipitated by naloxone (5 mg/kg) which was administered intraperitoneally 2 hours after the last dose of morphine. To study the effects of the aqueous, methanolic and chloroform extracts of both aerial parts and rhizome of the V. officinalis L. on naloxone-induced jumping in morphine-dependent animals, 10 injections of morphine (three administrations each day) for dependence and a dose of 5 mg/kg of naloxone for withdrawal induction were employed. Intraperitoneal injection of different doses (1, 5, 25 and 50 mg/kg) of aqueous, methanolic and chloroform extracts of the rhizome of V. officinalis L. 60 minutes before naloxone injection decreased the jumping response dose-dependently. Pre-treatment of animals with different doses (1, 5, 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg) of aqueous and methanolic extracts of aerial parts of V. officinalis L. 60 minutes before naloxone injection caused a significant decrease on naloxone-induced jumping. The chloroform extract of the aerial parts of V. officinalis L. did not show any significant changes on jumping response in morphine-dependent animals. It is concluded that the extracts of V. officinalis L. could affect morphine withdrawal syndrome via possible interactions with inhibitory neurotransmitters in nervous system.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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