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J Biol Chem. 2006 Aug 18;281(33):23514-24. Epub 2006 Jun 21.

Properties of human IgG1s engineered for enhanced binding to the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn).

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1
Department of Antibody Discovery and Protein Engineering, MedImmune, Inc., Gaithersburg, Maryland 20878, USA. dall'acquaw@medimmune.com

Abstract

We describe here the functional implications of an increase in IgG binding to the neonatal Fc receptor. We have defined in a systematic fashion the relationship between enhanced FcRn binding of a humanized anti-respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) monoclonal antibody (MEDI-524) and the corresponding biological consequences in cynomolgus monkeys. The triple mutation M252Y/S254T/T256E (YTE) was introduced into the Fc portion of MEDI-524. Whereas these substitutions did not affect the ability of MEDI-524 to bind to its cognate antigen and inhibit RSV replication, they resulted in a 10-fold increase in its binding to both cynomolgus monkey and human FcRn at pH 6.0. MEDI-524-YTE was efficiently released from FcRn at pH 7.4 in both cases. We show that MEDI-524-YTE consistently exhibited a nearly 4-fold increase in serum half-life in cynomolgus monkeys when compared with MEDI-524. This constituted the largest half-life improvement described to date for an IgG in a primate. For the first time, we demonstrate that these sustained serum levels resulted in an up to 4-fold increase in lung bioavailability. Importantly, we also establish that our non-human primate model is relevant to human. Finally, we report that the YTE triple substitution provided a means to modulate the antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity of a humanized IgG1 directed against the human integrin alpha(v)beta3. Therefore, the YTE substitutions allow the simultaneous modulation of serum half-life, tissue distribution and activity of a given human IgG1.

PMID:
16793771
DOI:
10.1074/jbc.M604292200
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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