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Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2006 Jul;30(7):1126-31.

Increased plasma fatty acid ethyl ester levels following inhibition of oxidative metabolism of ethanol by 4-methylpyrazole treatment in human subjects.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology, Division of Laboratory Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Recent experimental evidence suggests that fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE), nonoxidative metabolites of ethanol, mediate ethanol-induced organ damage. A direct association between pancreas-specific toxicity and increased levels of FAEE following inhibition of the oxidative metabolism of ethanol by 4-methylpyrazole (4-MP) has previously been shown in studies with rats.

METHODS:

We obtained plasma samples from 32 healthy human volunteers who drank ethanol following 4-MP or placebo ingestion to determine whether in vivo inhibition of oxidative metabolism of ethanol causes a shift to nonoxidative metabolism of ethanol and the subsequent production of increased levels of FAEE. Plasma FAEE were isolated by solid-phase extraction and quantified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

RESULTS:

Plasma FAEE levels in subjects receiving 4-MP treatment before ethanol consumption were elevated compared with plasma FAEE concentrations taken from control subjects who received a placebo before ethanol ingestion. Increased FAEE levels in the 4-MP treatment group occurred after peak blood ethanol, and peak FAEE levels were achieved. There was a correlation between the blood ethanol and the plasma FAEE levels, and the correlation persisted in the presence or absence of 4-MP. The peak FAEE values were greater in men than in women, with or without 4-MP treatment.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results indicate that the in vivo inhibition of the oxidative metabolism of ethanol using 4-MP results in an increased circulating concentration of FAEE, products of the nonoxidative metabolism of ethanol.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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