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Psychol Addict Behav. 2006 Jun;20(2):196-206.

Spontaneous cognition and HIV risk behavior.

Author information

1
Institute for Prevention Research and Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, San Bernardino, USA. astacy@usc.edu

Abstract

Theories of cognitive processes and risk behavior have not usually addressed spontaneous forms of cognition that may co-occur with, or possibly influence, behavior. This study evaluated whether measures of spontaneous cognition independently predict HIV risk behavior tendencies. Whereas a trait-centered theory suggests that spontaneous cognitions are a by-product of personality, a cognitive view hypothesizes that spontaneous cognitions should predict behavior independently of personality. The results revealed that spontaneous cognition was an independent predictor of behavior tendencies in cross-sectional analyses. Its predictive effect was stronger than drug use, a frequently emphasized correlate of HIV risk behavior in the literature, and comparable with sensation seeking in magnitude. The results suggested that a relatively spontaneous form of cognition may affect HIV risk behavior.

PMID:
16784366
DOI:
10.1037/0893-164X.20.2.196
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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