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Clin J Sport Med. 2006 May;16(3):223-7.

The influence of in-season injury prevention training on lower-extremity kinematics during landing in female soccer players.

Author information

1
Department of Biokinesiology and Physical Therapy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-9006, USA. cpollard@usc.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the influence of in-season injury prevention training on hip and knee kinematics during a landing task.

DESIGN:

Longitudinal pre-post intervention study.

SETTING:

Testing sessions were conducted in a biomechanics research laboratory.

PARTICIPANTS:

Eighteen female soccer players between the ages of 14 and 17 participated in this study. All subjects were healthy with no current complaints of lower extremity injury.

INTERVENTIONS:

Testing sessions were conducted prior to and following a season of soccer practice combined with injury prevention training.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS:

During each testing session three-dimensional kinematics were collected while each subject performed a drop landing task. Peak hip and knee joint angles were measured during the early deceleration phase of landing and compared between pre- and post-training using paired t-tests.

RESULTS:

Following a season of soccer practice combined with injury prevention training, females demonstrated significantly less hip internal rotation (7.1 degrees vs. 1.9 degrees; P = 0.01) and significantly greater hip abduction (-4.9 degrees vs. -7.7 degrees; P = 0.02). No differences in knee valgus or knee flexion angles were found post-season.

CONCLUSIONS:

Female soccer players exhibited significant changes in hip kinematics during a landing task following in-season injury prevention training. Our results support the premise that a season of soccer practice combined with injury prevention training is effective in altering lower extremity motions that may play a role in predisposing females to ACL injury.

PMID:
16778542
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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