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J Physiol. 2006 Sep 1;575(Pt 2):543-54. Epub 2006 Jun 15.

Calcium channel and glutamate receptor activities regulate actin organization in salamander retinal neurons.

Author information

1
Department of Ophthalmology, New York University School of Medicine, 550 First Avenue PHL 843, New York, NY 10016, USA.

Abstract

Intracellular Ca2+ regulates a variety of neuronal functions, including neurotransmitter release, protein phosphorylation, gene expression and synaptic plasticity. In a variety of cell types, including neurons, Ca2+ is involved in actin reorganization, resulting in either actin polymerization or depolymerization. Very little, however, is known about the relationship between Ca2+ and the actin cytoskeleton organization in retinal neurons. We studied the effect of high-K+-induced depolarization on F-actin organization in salamander retina and found that Ca2+ influx through voltage-gated L-type channels causes F-actin disruption, as assessed by 53 +/- 5% (n = 23, P < 0.001) reduction in the intensity of staining with Alexa-Fluor488-phalloidin, a compound that permits visualization and quantification of polymerized actin. Calcium-induced F-actin depolymerization was attenuated in the presence of protein kinase C antagonists, chelerythrine or bis-indolylmaleimide hydrochloride (GF 109203X). In addition, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), but not 4alpha-PMA, mimicked the effect of Ca2+ influx on F-actin. Activation of ionotropic AMPA and NMDA glutamate receptors also caused a reduction in F-actin. No effect on F-actin was exerted by caffeine or thapsigargin, agents that stimulate Ca2+ release from internal stores. In whole-cell recording from a slice preparation, light-evoked 'off' but not 'on' EPSCs in 'on-off' ganglion cells were reduced by 60 +/- 8% (n = 8, P < 0.01) by cytochalasin D. These data suggest that elevation of intracellular Ca2+ during excitatory synaptic activity initiates a cascade for activity-dependent actin remodelling, which in turn may serve as a feedback mechanism to attenuate excitotoxic Ca2+ accumulation induced by synaptic depolarization.

PMID:
16777935
PMCID:
PMC1819466
DOI:
10.1113/jphysiol.2006.114108
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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