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Osteoporos Int. 2006;17(9):1420-7. Epub 2006 Jun 13.

Femoral bone mineral density in patients with heart failure.

Author information

1
Center on Aging, MC-5215, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT 06030-5215, USA. Kenny@uchc.edu

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Heart failure and osteoporosis are common conditions in older, frail individuals. It is important to investigate interactions of the common problems in the aging population to devise relevant interventions.

METHODS:

Sixty individuals (43 men, mean age 77+/-9 years, and 17 women, mean age 78+/-12 years) with heart failure (HF) and 23 age- and gender-matched non-HF controls (15 men, eight women; mean age 77+/-9 years) underwent hip and bone mineral density (BMD) assessments; frailty assessment; physical performance assessment including 6-min walk, grip strength, and self-reported physical activity; and biochemical assessment including calcium, parathyroid hormone (PTH), 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25-OHD), estradiol, creatinine (Cr), and blood urea nitrogen levels (BUN).

RESULTS:

Significant differences between HF and control groups were found for BMD Z-scores of the femoral neck, total femur, and trochanteric region at the femur (p<.05). Further differences between groups included frailty score (p=.02), 6-min walking distance (p<.001), and self-reported physical activity (p=.001). In addition, several differences between groups were present for calcium (p=.054), PTH (p<.001), 25-OHD (p=.01), Cr (p=.04), and BUN (p=.01). In regression analysis, HF (defined as case, by ejection fraction, or by New York Heart Association class), frailty status, and vitamin D were significant predictors of lower bone mass at the femur.

CONCLUSIONS:

Individuals with HF have lower BMD, in part related to lower vitamin D status and higher frailty rates. Interventions to optimize vitamin D and physical activity should be explored to prevent bone loss in individuals with heart failure.

PMID:
16770521
DOI:
10.1007/s00198-006-0148-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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