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Biochemistry. 2006 Jun 20;45(24):7474-82.

Crystal structures of DPP-IV (CD26) from rat kidney exhibit flexible accommodation of peptidase-selective inhibitors.

Author information

1
Department of Structural Biology, Global Pharmaceutical Research and Development, Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, Illinois 60064-6098, USA. Kenton.Longenecker@Abbott.com

Abstract

Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) belongs to a family of serine peptidases, and due to its indirect regulatory role in plasma glucose modulation, DPP-IV has become an attractive pharmaceutical target for diabetes therapy. DPP-IV inactivates the glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1) and several other naturally produced bioactive peptides that contain preferentially a proline or alanine residue in the second amino acid sequence position by cleaving the N-terminal dipeptide. To elucidate the details of the active site for structure-based drug design, we crystallized a natural source preparation of DPP-IV isolated from rat kidney and determined its three-dimensional structure using X-ray diffraction techniques. With a high degree of similarity to structures of human DPP-IV, the active site architecture provides important details for the design of inhibitory compounds, and structures of inhibitor-protein complexes offer detailed insight into three-dimensional structure-activity relationships that include a conformational change of Tyr548. Such accommodation is exemplified by the response to chemical substitution on 2-cyanopyrrolidine inhibitors at the 5 position, which conveys inhibitory selectivity for DPP-IV over closely related homologues. A similar conformational change is also observed in the complex with an unrelated synthetic inhibitor containing a xanthine core that is also selective for DPP-IV. These results suggest the conformational flexibility of Tyr548 is unique among protein family members and may be utilized in drug design to achieve peptidase selectivity.

PMID:
16768443
DOI:
10.1021/bi060184f
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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